How To Optimize Your Steam Store Page In a Way That Gets Gamers To Buy Your Video Game at Full Price

Inside this article, you'll learn exactly what to say on your Steam Store Page to attract a gamer to buy your game right there.

You'll also learn what to show... and more importantly, what NOT to show... to get a gamer excited to buy your game.

It's important to optimize your Steam Store Page because most gamers will only visit it once. If you don't grab their attention that moment, you've lost that sale..

Or, the gamer will put your game into their wishlist, and wait for it to go on sale... and then maybe, just maybe, buy it.

If you want a gamer to buy your game the moment they visit your Steam Store Page, and pay full price, then here's what you need to know...

Indie Video Game Insight: Gamers Don't Trust You

The best way to approach your Steam Store Page is to know that a gamer doesn't trust it. They don't trust what you say... they don't trust your images... they don't trust your videos.

Gamers might get excited about all those things. But, your words, images, and videos about your game are NOT what sells the game.

Here's what does sell your game...

One of the first things a gamer does when they land on your Store Page, is they scroll down to the customer reviews.

One of the first thing a gamer does when they browse games on Steam, is they go down to the reviews section
Gamers want to see what other people are saying about a game before they decide to buy

What a gamer is doing, is they are looking for social proof. They want to see what others are saying about the game before they decide to spend money and time on it.

That's why gamers listen to youtuber's options. That's why gamers read the reviews. That's why gamers listen to gamer podcasts. That's why they check out Metacritic.

Gamers want to know what others are saying about a video game before they decide to buy it.

It's not what YOU say or show... it's what OTHERS say or show about your game.

Steam knows this. They know that one of the first things a gamer does when they land on a Store Page is, they scroll all the way down to the reviews.

Also, that's why Steam shows you the review rating in the top right. Gamers want to know a "score". They want to see a tangible number that makes sense to them so they can judge your game.

Again, Steam knows all this. And it's Steam's job to be as consumer friendly as possible (for some things, but not all). It's against their interest to show you all this. It's against their interest to allow negative reviews be shown right up front because bad reviews don't sell games.

But they still do it. They know that what other people say about a game helps sales. The benefits of letting gamers review and give a score to a game out numbers the negative aspects of doing it. Steam knows that without user reviews, they wouldn't sell as many games.

And that's why Steam also added in "Curators". They know that gamers want social proof. Gamers often buy a game after hearing about it many times.

Gamers want social proof, because they trust their peers. They don't trust the person trying to sell the stuff.

And the more trust you can build with your gamer, the more you'll improve your chances of a sale.

So, how do you build trust? How can you optimise your Store Sales Page? What if nobody is talking about your game? How do you get them talking about your game in the first place?

I'll show you how to do this soon. But let's keep going. I need to show you one more important insight. Once you understand what I'm trying to teach you, you'll see how easy it will be to optimize your Steam Store Page...

AAA Video Games Don't Trust Steam Store Page

AAA games hate letting gamers control the message. They hate using the Steam Store Page as a way to market their games. They hate reviewers. They know most of them talk bad about their games.

That's why Bethesda stopped giving out review codes before the launch of a game.

That's why some reviewers are blacklisted, and aren't given review copies anymore.

That's why For Honor spent millions on YouTubers and Streamers to play their game during launch. They know that first day, or first week sales, are the most important time to get as much profits as they can.

For Honor's marketing plan was to pay as many streamers play the game during launch, which helped sell the game
For Honor's marketing plan was to pay as many streamers play the game during launch, which helped sell the game

They know that if they let their games linger, and let the Steam Store Page do their selling, they'd make no money.

And that's what happened with For Honor. It's the 2 top selling game of 2017, so far. But a few months later, after all the hype is gone, gamers truly talk about how they feel about the game.

Just go to For Honor's Steam's Store Page. Gamers hate this game. But For Honor doesn't care. They're marketing was a success. They got their millions in their first week. And what happens after, meh. They don't care.

After For Honor's successful marketing launch, gamers speak about how they really feal about the game
After For Honor's successful marketing launch, gamers speak about how they really feal about the game

You see what I mean? AAA games know that they can't let gamers control the message.

So, what do you do? You know you need social proof. You know you need to let gamers vent, and let them talk about your game.

You also know that YOU need to control of the message too. AAA games go way too far with this. If they had it their way, they'd never let Steam put up reviews made by gamers. They'd control the entire message.

As an indie video game dev, there is a way leverage what gamers say about you... and there is a way to control the message so you don't get burned.

Here's how...

Optimizing Your Steam Store Sales Page: 3 Step System

Remember, a gamer doesn't know you. They don't trust you. They don't trust that your game will be fun. They don't trust what you tell them and show them on your Steam Store Page.

This "trust building" part is one the basics in selling anything. If you want to sell your video game when a gamer lands on your Store Page, you need some way of building that trust.

You can let go of all control, and let gamers do that for you. Meaning, you can put up your game on the Steam Store and HOPE that gamers, Metacritic, or Curoratos will talk about your game in a good way and build that trust.

But "hoping" isn't going to sell more video games.

Or you can do what AAA games do and PAY for this trust. Meaning, you pay reviewers, YouTubers, Streamers to play your game, and help you promote it. But this costs a lot of money.

So, you need to also control some of what is said about your game, too. You can't just rely on what other people will say.

Plus, this is the internet. The more NEGATIVE the review, the more attention the REVIEWER will get.

Reviewers know the secret of getting attention: negative news gets more views. And this hurts you.

When you relinquish all control over what is said about your video game, you leave it into the hands of reviews who are also trying to optimize their content. And slightly slanted, negative content gets more attention than positive content.

It sucks. But that's what you're up against. You're up against gamers that don't trust you. And you're up against content creators who get rewarded for talking shit about your game.

So, what do you do?

Here's 3 steps to help you optimize your Steam Store Page, so you improve the chances of getting the sale. Here's how to take control over the message of your video game so YOU influence a gamer.

Step 1: Use Your Steam Store Page as a Trust Builder... NOT as a Store

This goes against all common sense. This goes against intuitive thinking. Don't use your Store Page as a store? That makes no sense, right?

Here's what you need to know...

Most gamers don't treat your store as a store, anyway. What I mean is, most gamers don't buy on their first visit.

Gamers will use your store page as a way to gather more info about your game.

They'll read your description, look at your images and videos. And they will also read the reviews, and see what other people say about your game.

Then they'll leave. Most will never come back.

Gamers will come back to your store page after hearing about your game from other sources. It's only after a few visits when the gamer treats your Store Page as a real store.

But even then, most gamers STILL won't buy. They'll put your game on their wish list, and wait for a sales.

So, instead of using your Store Page as a store front, turn it into a chance to motivate your gamer so they buy your game next time they come back.

Let me show you exactly what I mean in step 2 and 3...

Step Two: Build Trust With a Gamer So You Build an Audience of Diehard Fans of Your Game Who Spread Good-Word-of-Mouth

You have a very small window for when a gamer buys your game. And there are times when that window is wide open, and gamer flood in and buy like crazy.

The first time when a window is wide open and gamers start buying like crazy is during a launch. This is usually because of a huge hype-cycle. What I mean is, the publisher spends a lot of money to market and hype the game before launch. This costs a lot of money.

The second time the window is wide when a gamer buys a game is during sales. This is usually way after a launch. The publisher knows that they already sold the game to the people who wanted it. This time they lower the price to grab the people who weren't so excited during the hype-cycle, and waited for a lower price.

But what if you had a consistent cash flow, and a consistent flow of customers? What if you didn't have to rely on a launch or a sale? How can you have gamer come back to your Steam Store Page and buy your game at full price?

Well, all this "trust stuff" I'm talking about is all about building good word-of-mouth. Instead of trying to get "customers", you're building an "audience".

And the reason you want an audience and not customers, is because an audience spreads good word-of-mouth. Having an audience means they will do the marketing for you -- for free.

You can't buy an audience. You can't hire somebody to give you an audience. You have to build it up slowly. You have to do it by building trust with them.

This is why I'm telling you to look at your store page as a trust-builder. Building trust with your gamer is basic fundamental way to build an audience.

And when you have an audience, you don't need to resort to gimmicky marketing... you don't need to pay for advertising that makes you cringe.

So, how does this help you optimize your Steam Store Page so you sell your video game at full price? How do you build an audience with your store page? Let me show you in step 3...

Step Three: Give Away Your Best Stuff So They Come Back To Buy Your Game

So, how do you build an audience of diehard fans of your game so they spread free good word-of-mouth?

How do you get them to buy your video game a full price?

And how do you use your Steam Store Page to do that?

Remember, most gamers who land on your Steam Store Page, will NOT buy. And most of those will never come back. If they do come back it's because of a sale.

So, instead of treating your store page as a store, treat it as a way to build an audience.

How?

Most game devs just want to put their game up on Steam, and if a gamer buys it, they buy it. The don't realize consumers don't behave this way.

A store page isn't enough to get a gamer motivated to buy a game. That's why gamers hold out, and go see what other people are saying about your game. They need social proof to motivate them to buy it.

Or they buy a game because it's brand new and there was a lot of hype behind it.

Or they buy a game because the gamer didn't fall for the hype, and waited for a Steam Sale.

But instead of relying on launch day or Steam Sales, or social proof, here's how to get consistent sales...

When a gamer lands on your Store Page, give them a reason to come back. And the best way to get them to come back is to let them experience your game before they decide to buy it.

Now, I know game demos aren't a new thing. I know that game devs don't like using game demos.

That's not what I'm talking about.

I'm not talking about a demo. I'm talking about a Playable Teaser. It's a self contained mini-game. It's about 15 minutes long. It's the BEST part of your main game. It's not the first 3 hours of your main game. There's no big tutorial, or a big story intro.

A Playable Teaser is your best salesperson, and will help you sell more copies of your full version
A Playable Teaser is your best salesperson, and will help you sell more copies of your full version

It's the best part of your main game... but not all of it.

It's designed to get a gamer excited about your main game, and get them wanting more.

Why do this? Why spend all this extra time creating a mini-game? Why not just get them to buy your game?

Because it's the best way to optimize your Steam Store Page. Instead of convincing a gamer to buy your game, your Playable Teaser does that.

Get a gamer to experience your game before they decide to buy it. Let your Playable Teaser do all the selling. Let your Playable Teaser get a gamer emotionally hooked. Get them wanting more.

It's a lot easier to give away a Playable Teaser than it is to sell a game. Your Playable Teaser is your best advertising. It's your best way to sell your main video game.

And best of all, gamers will want to spread it around if your Playable Teaser did a great job at getting them emotionally hooked.

At the end of your Playable Teaser, have a end screen showing where a gamer can buy the full version. This is how you get them to come back and buy your game.

Don't rely on Steam reviews... sales... first day launch hype... advertising... marketing...

Use your Playable Teaser like your best salesperson. Once it's out there in the internet, it's going to help you sell your main game.

And use your Steam Store Page to distribute your Playable Teaser.

Don't rely on Steam to sell your games. Take control of that selling process, by using the Store Page to distribute your Playable Teaser.

In your description in your Store Page, tell a gamer where they can download the Playable Teaser. Tell them they can play and experience your game before they decide to buy it. Tell them they can play a bonus content of your main game for free. Don't try to sell your main game right up front. Get a gamer to trust you first by giving away something that a gamer can't resist taking.

Then use your Playable Teaser as a salesperson. At the end of the Playable Teaser, funnel them back to you Steam Store Page, and tell them to buy the game.

When they finish your PLayable Teaser, that's when the buying window is wide open. Your Playable Teaser did all the selling for you. The gamer has convinced themselves they need to buy your full game. And they don't need to wait for a sale or see what others said about your game.

Your Playable Teaser did that for you.